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Archive for September, 2012

Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Constance Kim, Meditate/Create, Women’s Poetry Project
Project: Connie-Kim Ponderosa (CD)

i love this tip:
if i’m stuck on a piece,
it helps to take a field trip
to a completely different environment
than the one i’m writing about.
so,
if i’m writing about trains,
i might want to take a walk through the botanical gardens,
or go to a wig shop and try some wigs on.
it works every time!

http://www.conniekim.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Connie-Kim/158654157500946

 

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Bronwyn Mauldin, One Page At a Time
Project: THE STREETWISE CYCLE, a collection of linked short stories

Experiment. Try something new. Do the unexpected. Write something dangerous. Don’t have a character do the first thing you think of – have her do the second or third thing that comes to mind. Better yet, have her do the least expected thing. Terry has taught me how to take those kinds of intelligent, creative risks with my writing and with the business side of being a writer.

http://bronwynmauldin.com

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Cheryl Klein, One Page At a Time
Project: Lilac Mines, a novel from Manic D Press

At Writers at Work, I finally learned how to revise (a skill I made it through my whole MFA program without acquiring). Now I start a second–or third–draft with a blank page and paste in a few good parts rather than trying to sift through the tangles of my first draft. I rip things out, remove training wheels and put my characters in deeper jeopardy. Rewriting means letting oneself get tossed by the current, and I’m grateful to WAW for showing me it’s survivable.

http://breadandbread.blogspot.com/

 

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Julia Gibson, One Page At a Time, Women At Work
Project: THE COPPER HAND (Tor Books 2013)

From Terry’s workshops I learned the necessity of community.  Writing is so solitary, and we like that part.  But without my writing compadres, several of whom came my way through Terry, I would have lost heart long ago.  Over time I’ve built a robust collection of critiquers, taskmasters, commiserators, tipsters, technowizzes, guiding lights.  Not all of them are writers or even readers, but they encourage me to succeed.  Who’s on your list of writing buddies and cheerleaders?

juliamarygibson.com

 

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Susy Zepeda, Meditate/Create
Project: Tracing Queer Latina Diasporas: Escarvando Historical Narratives
of Ancestries and Silences

When revising my dissertation, I learned to set small, realistic goals that I could accomplish and reward myself for, instead of overwhelming myself with a huge set of unrealistic writing demands.

Connect with Susy Zepeda on Facebook.

 

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Women At Work
Project: THE PLEASURE’S ALL MINE: MEMOIR OF A PROFESSIONAL SUBMISSIVE

WAW taught me to retrain my ego to accept the fact that thoughtful critique of my work is the greatest gift another writer can give me.  The women in my group all but cured me of my tendency to overwrite everything, which freed me to do edits with a sense of excitement  rather than discouragement, embarrassment, or a sense of drudgery.  I did not start out being a writer who could finish a book.  WAW gave me the hope that I can be a writer who can do anything I set out to do, now.

The Pleasure’s All Mine

 

 

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Each day for the 15 days leading up to the WAW Open House (October 7, 2012, 2-5 p.m.), we’re going to feature a current or former participant who’s completed a major project (book, film, album, academic credential). We’ll find out what they learned that helped them with their work.

Cara Chow, One Page At a Time
Project: Bitter Melon, a novel

I used to think that a great story had to have compelling characters, a strong voice, and deep themes. What I learned from Terry’s class is that it also needs a suspenseful plot, even if it’s literary fiction. The most important yet difficult plot element for me to learn was the central question, the burning question that motivates the reader keep reading. I struggled for years to create a good central question for Bitter Melon. As a result, one of the first things fans of the book tell me is that they finished it in two days because they couldn’t put it down.

 http://www.carachow.com

 

 

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